Your Guide to the Best Ph.D. Student Loans

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Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

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The United States has the fourth-most doctorate degree holders in the world, according to the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. But the degree is still a prestigious one. Fewer than 20 in 1,000 citizens between the ages of 25 and 64 hold one.

If you’re planning on staying in school to get your Ph.D., you’re not only in for a few more years of school but also potentially thousands of dollars in Ph.D. student loans.

One way to help cover the cost of your education is to become a research or teaching assistant. But if you can’t find an assistantship to cover tuition and other expenses, you might need to resort to Ph.D. student loans.

To ensure that you pay as little in interest and fees as possible, it’s critical that you understand what your options are and how to compare them. To help you, we’ll list off some of the top options and what to look for.

The top Ph.D. student loans to consider

Depending on your needs and preferences, there are a couple of main options to which you have access: federal and private student loans. Let’s discuss each in turn.

Federal loans for Ph.D. students

The U.S. Department of Education offers Direct PLUS Loans to graduate and professional students. If you’re eligible, you can borrow up to the cost of attendance at your school minus any other financial aid you receive.

Unlike federal student loans for undergrads, Direct PLUS Loans require a credit check. So, if you have bad credit, you might need to ask someone to cosign the loan. You might qualify on your own if you have extenuating circumstances, such as:

  • There are errors on your credit report.
  • You had an account in collections but have recently paid it off.
  • You had a wage garnishment, but it’s been released.
  • You defaulted on a federal student loan but have since consolidated it, and it’s no longer in default.
  • You went through bankruptcy but can prove that it was discharged more than five years ago.

If you do get approved for a Direct PLUS Loan, you’ll pay an upfront loan fee of 4.264%, which the Department of Education will deduct from your loan disbursement. So, if you’re approved for a $10,000 loan, you’ll actually receive $9,573.60.

Also, if you get approved before July 1, 2018, you’ll pay a fixed interest rate of 7% on your Direct PLUS Loan.

The federal government doesn’t offer the best interest rates and fees for Ph.D. student loans, but it does offer some special perks.

For example, you’ll be eligible for the various income-driven repayment (IDR) plans. These can help you keep your monthly payments affordable. And depending on your career plans, you might also qualify for Public Service Loan Forgiveness (PSLF).

Private student loans

While private student loans don’t qualify for IDR plans or the PSLF program, they can offer lower interest rates and fees.

Several private student loan companies offer Ph.D. loans, including College Ave, CommonBond, and Citizens Bank. Also, online marketplaces such as LendKey can help you find regional banks and credit unions with funding options.

Here’s an idea of what type of interest rates you can expect:

Variable Interest Rates Fixed Interest Rates
CommonBond 3.62% – 9.54% 5.30% – 9.79%
Citizens Bank 4.07% – 12.04% 5.25% – 12.19%
College Ave 3.69% – 10.94% 5.29% – 12.07%
LendKey 4.63% – 9.71% 5.36% – 9.69%

As with a PLUS Loan, your credit has to be in good standing to qualify for private Ph.D. student loans. But if you can’t get approved on your own, you can get a cosigner to improve your chances.

Many of these lenders don’t charge a loan fee. So, if you borrow $10,000, you’ll get the full amount. And depending on the lender, you might also get access to other features. For example, some offer an interest rate reduction for setting up automatic payments.

Others offer cosigner release, which allows you to remove your cosigner from the loan after a few years of on-time payments and a second eligibility check.

Some of these lenders offer both fixed and variable interest rates, giving you more flexibility in how you pay back your loans. You can compare private Ph.D. student loans and weigh their costs and features against federal options.

Other ways to pay for your Ph.D. program

Financing your education is always an option, but the fewer loans you take out, the better. To limit your debt, consider these other funding options:

  • Scholarships and grants
  • University-based or external fellowship
  • Research or teaching assistantship
  • Employer tuition reimbursement
  • Federal work-study

Research each of these options in advance. Find out how much money, if any, you’ll need to cover your education. Then, compare Ph.D. student loans from private lenders and the Department of Education.

As you do your due diligence, you’ll have a better chance of finishing your Ph.D. program with less debt and lower monthly payments. That could make it easier to eliminate your debt once you start your career.

Need a student loan?

Here are our top student loan lenders of 2018!
LenderRates (APR)Eligibility 

1 = Citizens Disclaimer.

2 = CollegeAve Autopay Disclaimer: All rates shown include the auto-pay discount. The 0.25% auto-pay interest rate reduction applies as long as a valid bank account is designated for required monthly payments. Variable rates may increase after consummation.

* The Sallie Mae partner referenced is not the creditor for these loans and is compensated by Sallie Mae for the referral of Smart Option Student Loan customers.

3 = Sallie Mae Disclaimer: Click here for important information. Terms, conditions and limitations apply.
3.69%
12.07%
2
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit CollegeAve
3.83% – 12.11%Undergraduate and GraduateVisit Ascent
4.12% – 11.85%*3Undergraduate and GraduateVisit SallieMae
4.07%
12.19%
1
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit Citizens
4.63% – 9.71%Undergraduate and GraduateVisit LendKey
3.62%
9.79%
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit CommonBond
Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.