What You Need To Know Before Consolidating Federal AND Private Student Loans

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When Student Loan Hero CEO Andy Josuweit graduated from Bentley University, he had 16 student loans serviced by four different providers.

If you’re dealing with multiple student loans like Andy was, things can get confusing fast. But student loan consolidation, or the combination of multiple loans into one, can simplify your debt.

Instead of tracking numerous bills, you’d only have to make one payment to a single loan servicer. Consolidation, however, can refer to one of two approaches.

The first involves borrowing a Direct Consolidation Loan from the Department of Education, and it only applies to federal student loans. The second is student loan refinancing, which can include federal or private student loans.

Let’s take a closer look at both types of consolidation so you can decide if either option is right for you.

Option 1: Consolidate federal student loans with a Direct Consolidation Loan

If you have federal student loans, you can consolidate them with a Direct Consolidation Loan. Most federal student loans are eligible, including Direct Subsidized Loans, Direct Unsubsidized Loans, and PLUS Loans.

You can apply for a Direct Consolidation Loan for free at StudentLoans.gov. When you apply for federal student loan consolidation, you’ll also have the option to choose new repayment terms.

For example, you might choose a long term (up to 30 years) to lower monthly payments. Keep in mind, though, that extending your term means you’ll pay more interest over the long run.

You should also note that federal student loan consolidation causes your interest rate to go up slightly. When you consolidate, your new interest rate will be the weighted average of your old interest rate rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent.

This small increase could be worth the cost, though, since federal student loan consolidation can seriously simplify repayment.

Option 2: Combine private or federal student loans through refinancing

Your second option for consolidating comes in the form of student loan refinancing. You can refinance private and/or federal student loans, and you’ll do so through a private lender.

Not only will refinancing combine multiple loans into one, but it could also lower your interest rate. If you have decent credit and a steady income — or can apply with a creditworthy cosigner — you could qualify for low rates on a refinanced student loan.

What’s more, refinancing also lets you restructure your debt by choosing a new repayment plan. You might shorten your term to pay your loan off fast. Or you could give yourself extra time and decrease your monthly bills.

Most student loan refinancing companies, whether they’re a bank, credit union, or online lender such as SoFi or Earnest, offer both variable and fixed rates, as well as flexible repayment terms between five and 20 years.

If you’re considering refinancing, make sure to compare offers from a few different lenders. By shopping around, you can find the best offer for a refinanced student loan.

A note of caution about refinancing federal student loans

Refinancing and consolidating your loans through a private lender — and not the federal government — means you are taking out a private loan. As a result, you will no longer eligible for federal repayment options that can help you out during tough times, such as income-driven repayment plans or Public Service Loan Forgiveness.

Most private lenders don’t offer these same plans, though some might grant forbearance (or temporarily pause your payments) during a time of financial hardship.

Before turning any federal student loans into a private one through refinancing, make sure you’re confident about your ability to keep up with repayment, as you’ll lose access to federal protections.

Is student loan consolidation right for you?

Whether you have federal student loans, private student loans, or both, consolidation could be a good fit for you if you’re looking to simplify repayment and ease the burden of numerous due dates and loan servicers.

Federal student loan consolidation via a Direct Consolidation Loan can also lower your payments (assuming you choose a longer payoff term), but can result in more interest over time.

Consolidating and refinancing with a private lender, on the other hand, could lower your monthly payments or save you money on interest — or maybe even accomplish both.

Before making changes to your student loans, make sure you understand the ins and outs of both types of consolidation. By doing your due diligence, you’ll have a clear sense of how consolidation or refinancing will affect your costs of borrowing over the life of your loans.

Melanie Lockert contributed to this article.

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Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.