How Can Federal Work Study Help You Pay for College?

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As you fill out the FAFSA each year, you may notice a question that asks whether or not you are interested in Federal Work Study (FWS). I never checked this box when I was in school, and to this day it remains one of my biggest financial aid regrets.

Just what is work study, and how can the Federal Work Study program help you pay for college or graduate school? Read on to find out.

Federal Work Study is a form of financial aid

What is work study, exactly? As opposed to scholarships, grants, and loans — which simply require that you meet the eligibility criteria and make satisfactory academic progress — work study requires that you work at a job, either on or off campus, to earn the money.

Like scholarships and grants (but unlike loans), work study is a type of financial aid that does not have to be paid back. Undergraduate, graduate, and professional students in financial need are eligible for the work study program.

Although the rules of the Federal Work Study program state that you can only work part-time, you are guaranteed to make the federal minimum wage, which is currently $7.25 per hour. Additionally, work-study aid is exempt from FICA taxes, which means that your paychecks will be bigger because Social Security and Medicaid taxes will not be withheld.

Benefits of Federal Work Study

In addition to decreasing the amount of loans that you will need to take out to pay for school, there are many additional benefits to the work study program. Here are just a few:

1. You’ll work in a job that interests you.

Unlike most federal aid, which is awarded directly to the student, work-study funds are given to institutions of higher education to be allocated at their discretion. However, one of the stipulations of the funds is that they should be used to provide jobs that are related to students’ courses of study.

For example, you might be assigned to work in the front office of the department of your major. You could also work off-campus in a job that relates to your course of study, depending on the relationships that your university has built with other organizations in your community.

This means your job will be relevant to what you are studying. Beats waiting tables or slinging coffee, doesn’t it?

2. Your employer is required to work around your school schedule.

While most part-time jobs allow you to indicate your availability, there’s no guarantee you’ll get your requested hours. Even worse, taking extra time off to study for finals or an important test could be frowned upon.

This could force you to decide between earning the money you need to pay your bills and doing well academically. Unlike many off-campus jobs, work study employers are understanding of your situation, and they will work with you to come up with a schedule that allows you to put in the hours you need while still succeeding in school.

3. The work takes place during normal business hours during the semester.

Because work study aid is awarded on a semester-to-semester basis, you will not be asked to work during holidays or school breaks. So if you want to go home to visit family between semesters or take the summer off to participate in an internship, you will not need to make separate arrangements with your employer.

Additionally, because most FWS jobs take place on campus, it’s unlikely that you will be asked to work in the evenings or on the weekends. Instead, you can tell your employer when you are on campus and put in shifts before, between, or after classes.

This allows you to use your time efficiently by reducing the need to commute and taking advantage of times when you were on campus anyway.

The downsides to federal work study

Although the work study program has many advantages, there are a few things you need to know in order to make the most out of this program.

1. Funding is limited.

Institutions receiving FWS funds from the government receive a set amount that is awarded on a first-come, first-served basis. Once a college or university’s funds for a particular academic year have been allocated, no more is available until the next academic year.

It’s extremely important to fill out the FAFSA as soon as possible so that you are at the top of your school’s list to receive these funds. If you wait too long, the funding may be given to other interested students, and you may miss out on aid you might otherwise have been eligible for.

2. You won’t make enough to live off of.

If you’re hoping to completely offset your cost of living by participating in this program, think again. You will almost certainly not be offered more than 20 hours per week. And even with FICA taxes withheld, $7.25 an hour is probably not enough to live off of.

Is work study for you?

The program is not designed to fully cover your cost of living. Instead, the aim of FWS is to reduce your student loan burden so you can pay them off faster after graduation, and to provide professional experience in a job that is related to your major.

I know of several students who went on to work for the university as full-time staff members after graduating as a direct result of the time that they spent in the federal work-study program. While it may not be a full-time job while you’re still in school, it can lead to full-time work after graduation.

If you are interested in reducing your student loan burden after graduation, check the Federal Work Study box on the FAFSA. It pays — literally!

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** Discover's lowest rates shown are for the undergraduate loan and include an interest-only repayment discount and a 0.25% interest rate reduction while enrolled in automatic payments.

1 Important Disclosures for Earnest.

Earnest Disclosures

  1. Rates include 0.25% Auto Pay Discount
     
  2. Explanation of Rates “With Autopay” (APD)
    Rates shown include 0.25% APR discount when client agrees to make monthly principal and interest payments by automatic electronic payment. Use of autopay is not required to receive an Earnest loan.

    Available Terms
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CollegeAve Disclosures

College Ave Student Loans products are made available through either Firstrust Bank, member FDIC or M.Y. Safra Bank, FSB, member FDIC. All loans are subject to individual approval and adherence to underwriting guidelines. Program restrictions, other terms, and conditions apply.

(1)All rates shown include the auto-pay discount. The 0.25% auto-pay interest rate reduction applies as long as a valid bank account is designated for required monthly payments. Variable rates may increase after consummation.

(2)This informational repayment example uses typical loan terms for a freshman borrower who selects the Deferred Repayment Option with a 10-year repayment term, has a $10,000 loan that is disbursed in one disbursement and a 8.35% fixed Annual Percentage Rate (“APR”): 120 monthly payments of $179.18 while in the repayment period, for a total amount of payments of $21,501.54. Loans will never have a full principal and interest monthly payment of less than $50. Your actual rates and repayment terms may vary.

(3)As certified by your school and less any other financial aid you might receive. Minimum $1,000.

Information advertised valid as of 7/1/2019. Variable interest rates may increase after consummation.


4 Important Disclosures for CommonBond.

CommonBond Disclosures

A government loan is made according to rules set by the U.S. Department of Education. Government loans have fixed interest rates, meaning that the interest rate on a government loan will never go up or down.

Government loans also permit borrowers in financial trouble to use certain options, such as income-based repayment, which may help some borrowers. Depending on the type of loan that you have, the government may discharge your loan if you die or become permanently disabled.

Depending on what type of government loan that you have, you may be eligible for loan forgiveness in exchange for performing certain types of public service. If you are an active-duty service member and you obtained your government loan before you were called to active duty, you are entitled to interest rate and repayment benefits for your loan.
If you are unable to pay your government loan, the government can refer your loan to a collection agency or sue you for the unpaid amount. In addition, the government has special powers to collect the loan, such as taking your tax refund and applying it to your loan balance.

A private student loan is not a government loan and is not regulated by the Department of Education. A private student loan is instead regulated like other consumer loans under both state and federal law and by the terms of the promissory note with your lender.
If you refinance your government loan, your new lender will use the proceeds of your new loan to pay off your government loan. Private student loan lenders do not have to honor any of the benefits that apply to government loans. Because your government loan will be gone after refinancing, you will lose any benefits that apply to that loan. If you are an active-duty service member, your new loan will not be eligible for service member benefits. Most importantly, once you refinance your government loan, you will not able to reinstate your government loan if you become dissatisfied with the terms of your private student loan.

If your private student loan has a fixed interest rate, then that rate will never go up or down. If your private student loan has a variable interest rate, then that rate will vary depending on an index rate disclosed in your application. If the interest rate on the new private student loan is less than the interest rate on your government loans, your payments will be less if you refinance.
If you are a borrower with a secure job, emergency savings, strong credit and are unlikely to need any of the options available to distressed borrowers of government loans, a refinance of your government loans into a private student loan may be attractive to you. You should consider the costs and benefits of refinancing carefully before you refinance.

If you don’t pay a private student loan as agreed, the lender can refer your loan to a collection agency or sue you for the unpaid amount.

Remember also that like government loans, most private loans cannot be discharged if you file bankruptcy unless you can demonstrate that repayment of the loan would cause you an undue hardship. In most bankruptcy courts, proving undue hardship is very difficult for most borrowers.


5 Important Disclosures for Discover.

Discover Disclosures

  1. Students who get at least a 3.0 GPA (or equivalent) qualify for a one-time cash reward on each new Discover undergraduate and graduate student loan. Reward redemption period is limited. Please visit DiscoverStudentLoans.com/Reward for any applicable reward terms and conditions.
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  3. Aggregate loan limits apply.
  4. Lowest rates shown ARE FOR THE UNDERGRADUATE LOAN AND include an interest-only repayment discount and a 0.25% interest rate reduction while enrolled in automatic payments. The interest rate ranges represent the lowest INTEREST RATE OFFERED ON THE DISCOVER UNDERGRADUATE LOAN and highest interest rates offered on Discover student loans, including Undergraduate, Graduate, Health Professions, Law and MBA Loans. The fixed interest rate is set at the time of application and does not change during the life of the loan. The variable interest rate is calculated based on the 3-Month LIBOR index plus the applicable Margin percentage. The margin is based on your credit evaluation at the time of application and does not change. For variable interest rate loans, the 3-Month LIBOR is 2.50% as of July 1, 2019. Discover Student Loans will adjust the rate quarterly on each January 1, April 1, July 1 and October 1 (the “interest rate change date”), based on the 3-Month LIBOR Index, published in the Money Rates section of the Wall Street Journal 15 days prior to the interest rate change date, rounded up to the nearest one-eighth of one percent (0.125% or 0.00125). This may cause the monthly payments to increase, the number of payments to increase or both. Please visit https://www.discover.com/student-loans/interest-rates.html for more information about interest rates.
3.99% – 11.44%1Undergraduate and Graduate

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Undergraduate, Graduate, and Parents

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3.87%
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