Citibank Student Loans: What you need to know

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Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

Citi student loans

A long time ago — before the introduction of the Direct Loan Program — I consolidated my federal loans with Citibank. And what a ride it’s been for those Citi student loans: Since that time, my loans have gone from one servicer to another, to yet another.

In 2010, Citi sold off its student loan unit, and in 2017, the well-known bank finally stopped servicing the last of the private loans it had on the books. If you have student loans from Citi, you might not have an idea of who services them now or what to do next. Here’s what you need to know.

What happened to Citi student loans?

My student loans were part of the 2010 deal that sent $28 billion from Citi’s federal student loan portfolio to Sallie Mae*†. At that same time, Discover also took over $4 billion in Citi private student loans. As part of the dissolution of the student loan unit at Citi, the company itself also bought back $8.7 billion in student loans, both federal and private. The Department of Education similarly got in on the act, purchasing $4.7 billion of the federal loans.

What happens to loans after they are sold depends on what your new servicer does with them. My consolidated federal obligation ended up with Navient after it was spun off of Sallie Mae in 2014. It didn’t change any of terms of the loan — in fact, the transition was seamless, and I didn’t miss a payment or have to resubmit any of my information.

Private student loans sold to Discover could still be there — or passed off to yet another servicer.

Loans that were bought by the Department of Education were eventually sent out to servicers, since the government originates loans through the Direct program but doesn’t service them.

Finally, Citi serviced the loans it bought back until they were eventually sold off to other companies. The last batch of private Citi student loans ended up with FirstmarkServices.

How can you find your federal student loan servicer?

In most cases, your new Citi student loans servicer will contact you with information about where to send payments and how to manage your student loan account online. If this isn’t the case, you need to do a little hunting on your own.

Tracking your federal student loans is fairly straightforward. The National Student Loan Data System (NSLDS) is a database containing all of your information, including how to contact your servicer and how much you owe.

You need a Federal Student Aid ID (FSA ID) to log into the NSLDS. If you filled out a FAFSA after May 2015, you already have your ID. If you don’t have an ID, you can create one at the Federal Student Aid website.

Once you have your FSA ID, go to the NSLDS website and select “Financial Aid Review.” Everything you need will be listed. In order to get details about a specific loan, click on the blue number to the left of the loan type, indicated by the red arrow in the image below.

Citi student loans

Image credit: NSLDS

Once you do that, you can see information about the servicer, lender, and guaranty agency, though don’t forget that payments should be made to the servicer. You can also contact the servicer about making any changes to your repayment plan or other issues.

Citi student loans

Image credit: NSLDS

Finding your private student loan servicer

Things get a little trickier when you need the point of contact for private student loans. Those aren’t listed in the NSLDS. Instead, if payments are coming out of your bank account, you can check your statement for the name of the agency in charge of managing your loans. Once you know the agency, then you can visit the website for contact information and set up your payments.

If that doesn’t work, or if you’re having trouble figuring out where to send payments in the first place, check your credit report. You’re entitled to a free report from each of the three major bureaus every year by going to AnnualCreditReport.com.

Your credit report should contain a list of all of your debts and who’s servicing them. Get the phone number from the credit report and call to find out where to send payment.

Citi required to refund $3.75 million to some customers

Late in 2017, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) announced an enforcement action against Citi with regard to its handling of student loans. If your Citi student loans are part of the action, you might be eligible for a share of $3.75 million that will be refunded as a result of practices that prevented some consumers from taking advantage of benefits they were entitled to.

Citi must contact you if you are eligible for the refund. If Citi is still servicing your loans, the bank is supposed to issue a statement credit in the appropriate amount. If your debt is being managed by a different company, Citi is required to issue you a check. Watch your mail for a redress letter detailing what to expect if you are affected.

Stay on top of your student loans

Whether you had Citi student loans, or even if your loans were with another entity, it’s important to know your servicer and stay on top of the situation.

When you find out you have a new servicer, double-check your bank account. Are payments are still being made? While some transitions are seamless, others fail. If you notice a lapse, contact your new servicer to set up a new plan immediately.

Regardless of whether or not the transition went off without a hitch, it’s a good idea to visit the website of your new servicer and set up an online account. Being able to manage your student loans over the internet can make a huge difference in making sure everything’s happening as it should.

Finally, if you want to reduce the hassle, learn how to pay off your student loans faster using our ultimate guide.

*Sallie Mae Disclaimer: Click here for important information. Terms, conditions and limitations apply.
†The Sallie Mae partner referenced is not the creditor for these loans and is compensated by Sallie Mae for the referral of Smart Option Student Loan customers.

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LenderRates (APR)Eligibility 

1 = Citizens Disclaimer.

2 = CollegeAve Autopay Disclaimer: All rates shown include the auto-pay discount. The 0.25% auto-pay interest rate reduction applies as long as a valid bank account is designated for required monthly payments. Variable rates may increase after consummation.

* The Sallie Mae partner referenced is not the creditor for these loans and is compensated by Sallie Mae for the referral of Smart Option Student Loan customers.

3 = Sallie Mae Disclaimer: Click here for important information. Terms, conditions and limitations apply.
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2
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit CollegeAve
4.11% - 12.19%Undergraduate and GraduateVisit Ascent
4.00% - 11.85%*3Undergraduate and GraduateVisit SallieMae
2.93% -
9.67%
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit CommonBond
3.80% -
11.99%
1
Undergraduate, Graduate, and ParentsVisit Citizens
4.53% - 9.69%Undergraduate and GraduateVisit LendKey
Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.