Pros and Cons of Rolling Your Student Loans Into a Mortgage

roll-student-loan-debt-into-mortgage

If you’re looking to get out from under your student loan debt, it’s important to think through any strategy that lowers your monthly payments. This especially applies to the prospect of rolling your student loan debt into a mortgage.

Though this practice is controversial and potentially risky, the concept is attractive to some student loan borrowers who want to capitalize on the possibility of lower interest rates and monthly payments.

So should you consolidate student loans into a mortgage?

Pros and Cons of Using Your Mortgage to Pay Off Student Loans

Rolling student loan debt into a mortgage (also known as “debt reshuffling”), allows you to refinance your mortgage with either a new loan or an additional home equity loan.

The money from this new loan can then be used to pay off your student loan debt. This can be very attractive, particularly to those with sufficient home equity. But before you sign on the dotted line of your new loan or refinancing agreement, make sure you know how debt reshuffling will affect your bottom line.

Pro: Reduce Number of Payments

Your two biggest bills each month are almost certainly your mortgage and your student loan payments. Staying on top of both these important types of bills can be daunting, especially if your student loans are divided amongst several lenders.

By using a mortgage to pay off student loans, you can effectively cut down your payments from many to the magic number of one.

Con: Put It All on the Line

As a homeowner, you are aware that if you cannot pay for your home, it can be foreclosed on and the house seized. This is why it is called “secured debt” — the money owed is supported by an asset.

On the other hand, your student loan is unsecured. Even if you were to be declared bankrupt, the bank (or government) can’t come after you for your home, car, or other asset besides garnishing your wages.

Consolidating your student loans into a mortgage means your home becomes collateral for your student debt and is at risk if you are unable to keep up with payments.

Pro: Deduct for Savings

Both student loan and mortgage interest payments are tax deductible. However, your interest payments via a student loan may not qualify if you had to take a deferment or forbearance during the year, or if you make over $80,000 per year (or $160,000 as a married couple).

On the contrary, there are no such limitations when deducting the interest of a mortgage payment. However, you will need a tax specialist to help you navigate this more complicated tax situation.

Con: Give Up the Flexibility

For those who have trouble paying off their student loan debt, there are many options out there to provide relief.

For instance, the federal government provides several Income-Driven Repayment (IBR) plans to help lower monthly payments as a percentage of borrowers’ incomes.

And when a hardship hits — if you lose your job, for example — you may be able to request a deferment of payments on your student loans.

With your mortgage, however, you will still need to pay what is owed or risk losing the home.

Pro: Lower Interest Rate

According to HSH.com, the interest rate of a 15-year fixed mortgage averages 3.32%, while Direct Subsidized student loans disbursed after July 1st, 2015 have an interest rate of 4.29%.

In this case, consolidating student loans into a mortgage would mean savings in interest payments. However, it is important to note that those low mortgage averages are only available to those who are financially secure, have stellar credit, and have demonstrated an ability to pay off debt consistently.

Con: Pay More Interest Over Time

Saving on the interest can be a huge pro, but before you jump, you have to look at the numbers a bit closer — especially in terms of how much time is left on the loan.

Say your loan has 11 years left to be paid; if you use a mortgage to pay off your loan, you may be extending that 11 into 15, 20, or even 30 years. You will most likely be paying much more over the extended period of time.

Should You Roll Student Loan Debt Into a Mortgage?

Wanting to reduce your interest rate, lower the number of payments, and qualify for tax incentives are all great reasons to consider rolling your student loan into a mortgage.

However, with the risks, hidden costs, and fees that come with rolling student loans into a mortgage, it’s probably not worth it. You’re better off exploring federal repayment programs or student loan refinancing to make payments more manageable.

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Our team at Student Loan Hero works hard to find and recommend products and services that we believe are of high quality and will make a positive impact in your life. We sometimes earn a sales commission or advertising fee when recommending various products and services to you. Similar to when you are being sold any product or service, be sure to read the fine print, understand what you are buying, and consult a licensed professional if you have any concerns. Student Loan Hero is not a lender or investment advisor. We are not involved in the loan approval or investment process, nor do we make credit or investment related decisions. The rates and terms listed on our website are estimates and are subject to change at any time. Please do your homework and let us know if you have any questions or concerns.

Published in Mortgage, Pay Off Student Loans, Student Loan Consolidation Advice, Student Loan Repayment Options

  • Heat33

    Don’t forget another positive. Student loan interest deduction is capped at $2500, reducing your AGI on the front of the 1040. Whereas, the mortgage interest deduction isn’t capped. Downside – the AGI carries forward to state and local.

    • Thanks for sharing this! Definitely a helpful tip.

      Cheers,

      Jeffrey
      Student Loan Hero